How to Use Mass Suppression in PVS-Studio for Java?

Have you just run the analyzer and now you have no idea what to do with all this abundance of warnings? ๐Ÿ“œ Nothing to worry about – we made a special mechanism that can help you deal with them ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿป

In this video, you’ll learn about the inner workings of mass warnings suppression mechanism in PVS-Studio for Java. If you’re interested in other programming language, follow the links bellow ๐Ÿ™‚

Mass Suppression in PVS-Studio for C++

Mass Suppression in PVS-Studio for C#

Have fun watching this video and coding ๐Ÿ™‚

CWE Top 25 2021. What is it, what is it for and how is it useful for static analysis?

For the first time PVS-Studio provided support for the CWE classification in the 6.21 release. It took place on January 15, 2018. Years have passed since then and we would like to tell you about the improvements related to the support of this classification in the latest analyzer version.

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Deciding Whether to Learn Java vs. JavaScript

If you are an aspiring programmer, it can be challenging to choose between learning Java and JavaScript as they are both popular coding languages. However, the two languages differ, ranging from writing and assembling code to execution and capabilities. To help you decide whether to learn Java or JavaScript, read on for more information about Java and JavaScript, as well as their similarities and differences.

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PVS-Studio 7.14: intermodular analysis in C++ and plugin for JetBrains CLion

The PVS-Studio team is increasing the number of diagnostics with each new release. Besides, we are improving the analyzer’s infrastructure. This time we added the plugin for JetBrains CLion. Moreover, we introduced intermodular analysis of C++ projects and speeded up the C# analyzer core.

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Zero, one, two, Freddy’s coming for you

This post continues the series of articles, which can well be called “horrors for developers”. This time it will also touch upon a typical pattern of typos related to the usage of numbers 0, 1, 2. The language you’re writing in doesn’t really matter: it can be C, C++, C#, or Java. If you’re using constants 0, 1, 2 or variables’ names contain these numbers, most likely, Freddie will come to visit you at night. Go on, read and don’t say we didn’t warn you.


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