The First Bug on Mars

In 1971, the USSR delivered the first planetary rovers on skis to Mars, whose task was to puncture the surface with a rod (housing a dynamic penetrometer and a radiation densitometer) to see if Mars was solid or liquid dusty. The first probe crashed on November 27; the second soft-landed on December 2 but didn’t manage to get out of the “shell” of the lander, so that attempt didn’t count.

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We continue checking Microsoft projects: analysis of PowerShell

It has become a “good tradition” for Microsoft to make their products open-source: CoreFX, .Net Compiler Platform (Roslyn), Code Contracts, MSBuild, and other projects. For us, the developers of PVS-Studio analyzer, it’s an opportunity to check well-known projects, tell people (including the project authors themselves) about the bugs we find, and additionally test our analyzer. Today we are going to talk about the errors found in another project by Microsoft, PowerShell.

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do {…} while (0) in macros

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If you are a C programmer, you must be familiar with macros. They are powerful and can help you ease your work if used correctly. However, if you don’t define macros carefully, they may bite you and drive you crazy. In many C programs, you may see a special macro definition which may seem not so straightforward. Here is one example:

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5 inspiring examples – programming languages that popular computer games are written on

Video games are a big business. Total revenue for the U.S. video game industry reached $23.5 billion last year, a 5 percent increase from 2014. Behind every video game are programmers who help develop the product. Although programming languages vary by game, a few are the most popular. Here’s a look at the languages powering video game development.

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Chromium, the 5th Check

We checked Chromium more than once before, and those who follow our blog could reasonably ask, “Why another check? Weren’t there enough of them?” Sure, Chromium’s source code is particularly clean, which was shown by each of the previous checks, but new errors inevitably continue to appear. Repeated checks prove that the more often you use static analysis, the better. A good practice is to use the analyzer every day. An even better practice is to analyze the new code right after you finish writing it (automatic analysis of recently modified code).

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